Best Schools in New York 2022-2023 Best Colleges in New York 2022 and Best High School in New York 2022

Best Schools in New York – High Schools

Townsend Harris High School

Townsend Harris High School at Queens College is a public magnet high school for the humanities in the New York City borough of Queens. Students and alumni are frequently referred to as “Harrisites.” Townsend Harris is frequently ranked among the top 100 high schools in the country.

U.S. News & World Report ranked THHS first in New York State in 2019, 2020, and 2021, and 12th overall in 2021.

This is the logo for Townsend Harris High School.
This is the logo for Townsend Harris High School.

Townsend Harris High School Address

Located in: Queens College, City University of New York
Address: 149-11 Melbourne Ave, Queens, NY 11367
Phone: (718) 575-5580
Number of students: 1,109 (2017)

District: New York City Public Schools
Founded: 1904
Grades: 9–12
Colors: Crimson, Gold

Yearbook: The Crimson and Gold
Mascot: Hawks

Townsend Harris High School Requirements 2022, Acceptance Rate

Townsend Harris High School application will open in late January 2022. The deadline to apply will be early March 2022 (the week of February 28, 2022). Students can apply to Townsend Harris through their home school, whether it is public or private.

Students at Townsend Harris are high achievers for life. Their commitment to personal development and academic discipline begins before students arrive at our school and continues after they leave.

Students from all five boroughs of New York City can apply to Townsend Harris, and they are chosen through a competitive screening procedure rather than a single entrance exam. Admission to the ninth grade is based on sixth-grade standardized-test scores, final report card grades, and seventh-grade marking period grades. Admission to the tenth grade is based on seventh-grade standardized-test scores, final report card grades, and eighth-grade marking period marks.

9th Grade AdmissionPercentage10th Grade AdmissionPercentage
6th Grade ELA/Math State Test Scores40%7th Grade ELA/Math State Test Scores40%
6th Grade Final Grades50%7th Grade Final Grades50%
7th Grade Marking Period Grades10%8th Grade Marking Period Grades10%

All applicants will be ranked according to their composite rubric score, as follows:

  • Rank of 1 = 91 – 100%
  • Rank of 2 = 86 – 90%
  • Rank of 3 = 81 – 85%
  • Rank of 4 = 76 – 80%
  • Rank of 5 =  71 – 75%
  • Rank of 6 = 66 – 70%
  • Rank of 7 = Below 66%

Townsend Harris High School Admission 2022

Low-income applicants (kids who qualify for Free or Reduced Lunch) are considered equally and randomly for the first 50% of offers among all applicants with the same rank, beginning with the rank of 1.

The remaining applicants with the same rank (both low-income and non-low-income) are then given equal and random consideration for the remaining 50% of offers. This is done separately for children in regular education and pupils with IEPs.

Alumni

Manfred Halpern, political scientist expert in modern Middle East
Neil Drumming (’92) journalist, writer, and director of the film Big Words (2013), and podcast producer for This American Life, Serial, and The New York Times
Performing arts and entertainment

Irving Caesar (’10) was a lyricist whose works include: “Swanee,” and “Tea for Two”. He co-wrote the songs in the musical No, No, Nanette, and was an early collaborator with George Gershwin.[12]
Hari Kondabolu (2000) is an American stand-up comic.

Frank Loesser is an Oscar, Tony, and Pulitzer prize award-winning composer and songwriter best known for Guys and Dolls and How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.[13]
Edward G. Robinson (’10) was an actor known for films like Little Caesar, Double Indemnity, Key Largo and The Ten Commandments.

Divya Narendra ’00
Alexander Sachs was a banker and economist, best known for delivering the Einstein–Szilárd letter to Franklin Roosevelt, and convincing him to begin research into the construction of a nuclear weapon.
Nily Rozic is a New York State Assemblywoman

Brooklyn Technical High School

Brooklyn Technical High School, also known as Brooklyn Tech and administratively as High School 430, is a prestigious public magnet high school in New York City that specializes on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Along with Stuyvesant High School and the Bronx High School of Science, it is one of three original specialized high schools run by the New York City Department of Education. Brooklyn Tech is regarded as one of the most prominent and selective high schools in the country.

This is the logo for Brooklyn Technical High School.
This is the logo for Brooklyn Technical High School.

Passing the Specialized High Schools Admissions Test is required for admission to Brooklyn Tech. Every November, around 30,000 eighth and ninth graders take the three-hour test to gain admission to eight of the nine specialized high schools. Each year, approximately 1,900 to 1,950 students are admitted.

Among its graduates are prominent scientists, inventors, innovators, Fortune 500 CEOs and founders, high-ranking diplomats, academic professors, literary and media luminaries, professional athletes, National Medal recipients, Nobel laureates, and Olympic medalists.

Brooklyn Technical High School Address

Address: 29 Fort Greene Pl, Brooklyn, NY 11217
Hours: Closes 4PM
Phone: (718) 804-6400
Admissions: Competitive Examination

School number: 430
Population: 5,884
Principal: David Newman
District: New York City Public Schools

Founded: 1922
Colors: White, Navy Blue

Brooklyn Technical High School Requirements 2022, Acceptance Rate

What courses are required?

• 2 semesters of Design & Drafting for Production (NYSED Art Requirement)
• 2 semesters of AP Principles of Computer Science
• 8 semesters of English Language Arts
• 8 semesters of Social Studies (4 Global History, 2 US History, 1 US Government, 1 Economics)

• 6 semesters of Mathematics (Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry)
• 6 semesters of Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics)
• 6 semesters of World Languages (Chinese, French, Italian or Spanish)
• 8 semesters of Physical Education & 1 semester of Health Education
• A “Major” concentration

The completion and passing of NY State Regents exams are also required. At Tech, all students must pursue the Advanced Regents Diploma which requires passing:

• ELA Regents (11th grade)
• Global History Regents (10th grade), US History Regents (11th grade)
• Algebra Regents (8th or 9th Grade), Geometry Regents (9th or 10th grade), Trigonometry Regents (10th or 11th grade)
• Living Environment Regents (8th or 9th Grade), Chemistry Regents (10th grade), Physics Regents (9th or 11th grade)
• World Language (10th or 11th grade)

To earn the coveted NCSSSMST Brooklyn Tech Diploma, in addition to the Advanced Regents Diploma requirements above, the students must:

• pass 2 semesters of Design & Drafting for Production
• pass 2 semesters of AP Principles of Computer Science
• pass Chemistry & Physics and their corresponding Regents exams
• pass all courses required for their specific major
• complete the required community service

Transport

The Fulton Street (G train) and Lafayette Avenue (C train) stations of the New York City Subway are nearby, as are additional BMT and IRT services at DeKalb Avenue and Atlantic Terminal, which also serves the Long Island Rail Road.

See also  Townsend Harris High School Requirements 2022, Acceptance Rate 2022, Admission 2022

Additionally, the B25, B26, B38, and B52 routes of New York City Bus stop near Brooklyn Tech. Students who live a particular distance from the school are given full-fare or half-fare student MetroCards for public transit on their first day of school at BTHS, as well as the first day of each subsequent academic term.

Majors at Brooklyn Tech

Brooklyn Tech has a college-style major system, which is rare for an American high school. During the second semester of their sophomore year, students are assigned a major after ranking all majors in order of preference.

These majors comprise courses, often Advanced Placement or Project Lead the Way (PLTW), that focus on the specific area of interest assigned to students during their final two years at Tech.

Each major has a different algorithm (PI index) that is used to rank students based on their major ranking preference and current averages from freshman and sophomore year.

If a student does not get into their first choice, the student with the highest PI index for their second choice will be given priority over another student with a lesser average on the same major preference.

Below is the list of majors at Brooklyn Tech.

• Aerospace Engineering
• Architectural Engineering
• Biological Sciences
• Chemical Engineering

• Civil Engineering
• Digital Media
• Electrical Engineering
• Environmental Science Research

• Finance
• Industrial Design
• Law and Society
• LIU Advanced Health Professions

• LIU PharmD
• Applied Mathematics
• Mechatronics and Robotics
• Pharmaceutical Sciences

• Physics
• Social Science Research
• Software Engineering

Brooklyn Technical High School alumni

The following is a list of noteworthy Brooklyn Technical High School alumni. Brooklyn Technical High School also boasts a one-of-a-kind Hall of Fame, which honors alumni who have made major contributions to STEM.

  • Gary Ackerman ’60 – United States Representative, New York (1983–2013)
  • Warren Adler ’45 – novelist
  • David Antin, ’50 – poet, art critic, professor
  • Henry L. Bachman, President of IEEE in 1987. Vice President of BAE Systems
  • Karol J. Bobko ’54 – NASA astronaut] (1999 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • George R. Caron ’38 – Tail gunner aboard the Enola Gay
  • John Catsimatidis ’66 – Chairman and CEO, Red Apple Group
  • Frank A. Cipriani, Ph.D., ’51 – President, SUNY at Farmingdale (1998 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Harry Chapin ’60 – Entertainer, humanitarian (2000 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Tom Chapin ’62 – Entertainer, humanitarian
  • Lorenzo Charles ’81 – Professional basketball player
  • Kim Coles ’80 – Actress
  • Diane Dixon ’82 – Athlete
  • John Piña Craven ’42 – Chief Scientist, US Navy Special Projects Office
  • James E. Dalton ’49 – former Chief of Staff, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe; retired United States Air Force general (1998 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Richard Fariña ’55 – Writer, folksinger
  • Lou Ferrigno ’69 – Bodybuilder, actor
  • Meredith Gourdine, Ph.D., ’48 – Electrogasdynamics pioneer, ’52 Olympic silver medalist] (1998 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Warren Foster ’23 – Cartoon music composer
  • Geoff Fox ’68 – WTNH meteorologist
  • Elmer L. Gaden c.’40 – “The father of biochemical engineering”
  • Carl Gatto ’55 – Alaska House of Representatives from 2003 to 2012
  • Gerry Goffin ’57 – Brill Building lyricist
  • Francis Grasso ’67 – Early disco DJ
  • David Groh ’58 – actor, television’s Rhoda
  • Gary Gruber, Ph.D., ’58 – Author, physicist, testing expert
  • Isaac Heller (1926-2015, class of 1943), toy manufacturer who co-founded Remco (2013 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Herbert L. Henkel ’66 – former Chairman of Ingersoll Rand Corporation
  • Tommy Holmes ’35 – Major League Baseball player
  • Joseph J. Jacobs, Ph.D., ’34 – Author, engineer, humanitarian (2003 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Lamont Jones (born 1972) – basketball player
  • Marvin Kitman ’47 – Author, Newsday television critic] (1998 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Joseph J. Kohn, ’50 – Mathematician (2000 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Richard LaMotta ’60 – Founder of Chipwich, ice cream sandwich company
  • Ivan Lee ’99 – Internationally ranked saber fencer
  • Al Lerner ’51 – Businessman, ran MBNA and former owner of the Cleveland Browns
  • MSgt. Meyer S. Levin ’34 – Decorated Army Air Force hero, World War II (1999 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Harvey Lichtenstein ’47 – Executive Director, Brooklyn Academy of Music (1967–99) (1999 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Turk Lown, Major League Baseball player
  • William L. Mack ’57 – Chairman, Mack-Cali Realty; philanthropist (2003 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Jack Maple ’70x – New York City Deputy Police Commissioner for Crime Control Strategies (1994-1996) and developer of CompStat process; completed high school equivalency after dropping out
  • Richard Matheson ’43 – Author, screenwriter
  • Barry Mayo ’70 – Radio executive
  • Matthew F. McHugh ’56 – U.S. Congressman (1975–93)
  • Londell McMillan ’83 – Attorney
  • Conrad McRae ’89 – Professional basketball player
  • Saverio “Sonny” Morea ’50 – American aerospace engineer, former NASA employee, and flight instructor. He managed the development of the Rocketdyne F-1 and Rocketdyne J-2 as well as the Lunar Roving Vehicle.
  • Tony “Anthony” Moran ’82 – DJ, remix/record producer
  • Mike Nieves – Deputy Chief of Staff to New York City Council Speakers Christine Quinn, Gifford Miller and Peter Vallone
  • Ronnie Nunn ’68 – NBA Director of Officials
  • Arno Allan Penzias, Ph.D ’51 – 1978 Nobel laureate in physics (2000 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Frederik Pohl ’37x – Science fiction author; dropped out; received honorary diploma 2009
  • Vernon Reid ’76 – Musician, Living Colour
  • Sal Restivo, Ph.D., ’58 – Author, researcher] (1998 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Leonard Riggio ’58 – Chairman, Barnes & Noble (1999 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Werner Roth ’66 – Professional soccer hall-of-famer
  • Albert Ruddy ’48 – Two-time Academy Award-winning producer
  • Mark Sarvas ’82 – Novelist, book critic
  • Steven Sasson ’68 – National Medal of Technology and Innovation-winner for work on digital photography (2013 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • John P. Schaefer, President Emeritus of the University of Arizona.
  • Raymond Scott ’27 – composer, pianist, engineer
  • Irwin Shapiro ’47 – astrophysicist
  • Keeth Smart ’96 – Men’s fencing silver medalist, 2008 Olympics
  • Erinn Smart ’97 – Women’s fencing silver medalist, 2008 Olympics
  • Chris Stanley – Radio producer for the Ron and Fez show
  • George Wald, Ph.D., ’23 – Biologist, ’67 Nobel Laureate] (1998 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Charles B. Wang ’62 – Co-founder, Computer Associates International; minority owner, New York Islanders hockey team (2000 Hall of Fame inductee)
  • Anthony D. Weiner ’81 – United States Representative from New York (1999–2011) and convicted sex offender
  • Robert Anton Wilson ’50 – futurist
  • Jumaane Williams ’94 – New York City Council member
  • Walter Yetnikoff ’49 – Record industry executive
  • Paul Yesawich ’41 – professional basketball player
  • Marilyn Zayas ’82 – Judge, Ohio’s First District Court of Appeals
  • Lee David Zlotoff ’70 – television writer

High School Math Science and Engineering at CCNY

The High School for Math, Science, and Engineering at City College (commonly shortened to High School for Math, Science, and Engineering, HSMSE, or HSMSE @ CCNY) is one of New York City’s nine public magnet, specialized high schools. It serves gifted children from all throughout the city. It is situated on the City College of New York’s campus (CCNY).

This is the logo owned by High School for Math, Science and Engineering at City College for High School for Math, Science and Engineering at City College.
This is the logo owned by High School for Math, Science and Engineering at City College for High School for Math, Science and Engineering at City College.

HSMSE was formed in 2002, together with Queens High School for the Sciences at York College and High School of American Studies at Lehman College, with a concentration on engineering and design, and was envisioned as a small school with around 400 students.
Because the school has a small population, kids and teachers can form stronger bonds.

High School Math Science and Engineering at CCNY Address

Located in: The City College of New York
Address: 240 Convent Ave, New York, NY 10031
Hours: Open 24 hours
Phone: (212) 281-6490

Number of students: 492
Mascot: Dragon
District: New York City Public Schools
Founded: 2002

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Highest grade: Twelfth grade
Language: German hsmse.org
Grades: 9–12

High School Math Science and Engineering Requirements 2022, Acceptance Rate 2022

Entrance Exam

The High School for Math, Science, and Engineering (HSMSE) is one of eight highly selective specialized high schools founded and operated by the New York City Department of Education to meet the academic needs of brilliant children.

Admission to the High School for American Studies at Lehman College, the Queens High School for The Sciences at York College, the Bronx High School of Science, Brooklyn Technical High School, The Brooklyn Latin School, Staten Island Technical High School, Stuyvesant High School, and HSMSE is granted to students who achieve the highest scores on the Specialized High School Admissions Test (SHSAT).

Grades, state test scores, and attendance records are not taken into account in specialized high schools. Acceptance is solely based on the SHSAT score.

Test Scores and Results

The SHSAT is available to all eighth and ninth grade students in New York City’s five boroughs who want to enter one of the eight specialized high schools. All eight schools take the same exams.

The tests are rated and arranged in descending order of difficulty, from greatest to lowest. The qualifying score for each school varies from year to year and is determined by the number of available seats and the scores of all candidates. Seats are filled in the order of highest test results.

Students who fall short of their first-choice school’s cutoff may be allocated to their second-choice school if their score exceeds that school’s cutoff. This process is repeated until all seats in all eight schools are filled.

Students take the exam at their borough’s authorized school. In eighth grade, exam tickets are obtained from the middle school guidance counselor. The DOE determines the SHSAT date, which is administered in late October. Accepted students are notified at the same time as the rest of the school’s pupils.

The New York City Department of Education website has test dates and further information on the SHSAT.

In the fall, HSMSE hosts an Open House. Our open house includes an information session and lecture from Principal Bonds, as well as the chance to speak with teachers and students on the quad. Each year, the date of the Open House is listed in the Specialized High School Handbook.

Accepted students and their parents are invited to visit HSMSE in the spring, prior to the deadline for final high school decisions. Students will have the opportunity to tour classrooms, meet professors and students, and ask questions.

Transportation

The 137th Street-City College (1 train), 135th Street (B and C trains), and 145th Street (A, B, C, and D trains) stations of the New York City Subway are all close. In addition, the M2, M3, M4, M5, M11, M100, M101, and Bx33 routes of New York City Bus stop at HSMSE. Students who live within a particular radius of the school are given full-fare or half-fare student MetroCards for public transit.

Queens High School for the Sciences at York College

Queens High School for the Sciences at York College (abbreviated QHSSYC or QHSS) is a public magnet high school in New York City operated by the New York City Department of Education that specializes in mathematics and science.

It admits pupils solely on the basis of their performance on the Specialized High Schools Admissions Test (commonly referred to as the SHSAT). The school was formed in 2002, together with City College’s High School of Math, Science, and Engineering and Lehman College’s High School of American Studies.

QHSSYC belongs to the National Consortium of Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science, and Technology (NCSSSMST).

This is a logo for The Queens HS for the Sciences at York College.
This is a logo for The Queens HS for the Sciences at York College.

QHSSYC was named the 52nd best “Gold Medal” high school in the United States and the 8th best “Gold Medal” high school in New York by U.S. News & World Report in 2012.

Queens High School for the Sciences at York College was ranked third in the state and 25th overall in the USA for finest high schools in 2015.

The New York City Department of Education runs the school. According to the Department of Education’s annual school reports from 2010, QHSSYC has one of the greatest graduation rates, test scores, and attendance records in New York City, and was given the highest attainable rating of ‘A.’

Queens High School for the Sciences at York College Requirements 2022, Acceptance Rate 2022

Took at Least One AP® Exam 100%
Passed at Least One AP® Exam 96%
Mathematics Proficiency 99%
Reading Proficiency 100%
Graduation Rate 99%

Queens High School for the Sciences at York College is the fourth best high school in New York. Advanced Placement® courses and examinations are available to students.

Queens High School for the Sciences at York College has a 100% AP® participation rate. The total minority enrollment is 94%, and 61% of pupils are economically challenged.

Queens High School for the Sciences at York College is one of 520 public high schools in New York City.

Tuition

The school has an arrangement with York College that permits high school students to access college facilities like the library, cafeteria, and gymnasium. It is located on the second level of the scientific building of the campus.

As part of its college-preparatory curriculum, Queens High School for the Sciences emphasizes science and mathematics.

The curriculum is concentrated on the Regents and AP tests, and the school produces some of the greatest test scores in the country.

QHSSYC is a New York City Department of Education high school, and graduation with a New York State Regents diploma requires 44 credits. New York State establishes the Advanced Regents Diploma requirements.

Some students take part in mentorships and internships to build research projects that are presented at various fairs and symposiums across the United States, including the International Science and Engineering Fair.

Principals

Brian Jetter, the company’s founding principle, retired in June 2006, and Jie Zhang took his position. Principal Jie Zhang was reassigned to Stuyvesant High School in June 2011, and Dr. David Marmor took her place.

Dr. Marmor left after the 2012–13 school year, and Lenneen Gibson served as Principal until October 2016, when she was temporarily replaced by B.D. Anthony. Ana De Jesus, who took over as principal in November 2016, is now in charge.

Transport

The Sutphin Boulevard – Archer Avenue (E, J, Z) station of the New York City Subway is close, as are the Q42, Q84, Q65, Q25, Q34, Q83, Q112, Q110, Q111, Q30, Q31, Q6, Q9, Q8, Q41 routes of the New York City Bus. On the first day of school, students who live a specified distance from the school are given full-fare student MetroCards for public transportation.

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Bronx High School of Science

The Bronx High School of Science (also known as Bronx Science or Science, and formerly Science High) is a public magnet, specialized high school in New York City, New York. The New York City Department of Education runs it.

Passing the Specialized High Schools Admissions Test is required for admission to Bronx Science. Every November, around 30,000 eighth and ninth graders take the three-hour exam for admission to eight of the nine specialized high schools. The test is exceedingly competitive, with only 800 of the 30,000 applicants accepted each year to Bronx Science.

Bronx Science, which was founded in 1938 in the Bronx, New York City, is presently located in an educational district known as the Educational Mile in Bedford Park, a neighborhood in the northwest side of the Bronx.

As of 1999, the exam for students in the eighth grade was allegedly taken by more than 20,000 kids each year.

Although it was founded with a focus on mathematics and science, Bronx Science now emphasizes the humanities and social sciences, and it continues to draw students with diverse interests outside of math and science.

It has produced the most Nobel laureates in science of any secondary school in the world, with eight Nobel Prize-winning alumni, seven in physics and one in chemistry.

The new logo of the Bronx High School of Science designed by Pamela Prichett and Diego Vainesman.
The new logo of the Bronx High School of Science designed by Pamela Prichett and Diego Vainesman.

The French Lycée Louis-le-Grand has also produced eight Nobel Prize winners, but only four are for science (two for physics, one each for medicine and economics).

Bronx Science alumni have also received two Turing Awards, popularly known as the Nobel Prize in computer science; six National Medals of Science, the nation’s highest scientific distinction; and eight Pulitzer Prizes.

Bronx High School of Science Address

Address: 75 W 205th St, Bronx, NY 10468
Hours: Closes 4PM
Phone: (718) 817-7700
Average SAT scores: 2,029

Principal: Rachel Hoyle thesciencesurvey.com
District: New York City Public Schools
Colors: Green, Gold
Founder: Morris Meister
Founded: 1938

Bronx High School of Science Requirements 2022, Acceptance Rate 2022

Applications can be obtained ONLY from the Guidance Counselor of your CURRENT SCHOOL.

Bronx High School has found that the following qualifications are common to students who are most often successful at Bronx Science:

  • academically successful in the lower grades
  • involved in extra curricular activities
  • have a good attendance record
  • are serious about school-work and homework
  • are well behaved
  • and whose parents are actively involved in their child’s education

Entrance Exam

The Specialized High Schools Admissions Test (SHSAT) measures the knowledge and abilities required for high-achieving pupils to succeed in high school. These abilities include the ability to comprehend English writing, the ability to think through a linguistic problem in order to make a reasoned conclusion based on the available information, and mathematical problem-solving abilities.

Academics

Students at Bronx Science follow a college preparatory curriculum that includes four years of lab science, math, English, social studies, two or three years of foreign language, and a year of fine arts, as well as required courses and a diverse range of electives, including honors and advanced placement (AP) classes that allow students to bypass introductory college science courses. There are around 160 distinct courses available. Students can conduct independent research, and many participate in the annual Intel Science Talent Search (formerly sponsored by Westinghouse).

Students in the biological sciences have the option of completing a specific “honors” biology course, which includes additional laboratory exposure. Microbiology, physiology, forensic science, human genetics, evolution, astronomy/astrophysics, organic chemistry, electronics, epidemiology, neurology, and other science electives are available.

The mathematics department provides typical AP courses in AB/BC calculus and statistics, as well as courses in multivariable calculus and computer science, such as multivariable calculus and partial differential equations and AP Computer Science A.

In the fall of 2007, a course in linear algebra and differential equations was given for the first time. Students must study four years of English, with electives such as honors speech, honors creative writing, exploring science fiction, journalism workshop, and AP English required.

Four years of social studies or history classes are required, including US and world history, economics, and electives in psychology, law, finance, and global studies. If pupils had previously studied a year of language prior to high school, a minimum of two years of language are required.

Bronx Science provides French, Spanish, Latin, Italian, Chinese, and Japanese language services. Hebrew, Russian, Korean, and German were previously available.

Students in their sophomore year must take Applied Science or a class to fulfill the Sophomore Research Requirement.

Introduction to Engineering, Coding for All, Social Science Research, Biology/Physical Science Research, and Math Research are all classes that fulfill the Sophomore Research Requirement.

Students can continue their research in their junior and senior years, which allows them to collaborate with mentors and submit their final research report to major contests such as the Intel Science Talent Search.

Students must also receive credit for two terms of a fine arts class or the equivalent. The fine arts requirement is typically met at Bronx Science’s Summer Program, which includes Drama, Music, and Art. Students typically “double up” on two of these courses to fulfill the fine arts requirement once and for all during the course of one summer.

During the regular school year, however, it is still feasible to meet the fine arts requirement by taking a music option such as Jazz Band or an arts elective such as AP Studio Art.

Step aerobics, spin cycling, weight training, basketball, hockey, badminton, volleyball, team handball, fitness, and yoga are all necessary courses.

In addition to the two fine arts courses, the Health requirement may be accomplished during the Bronx Science Summer Program.

Transport

The Bedford Park Boulevard (B and D trains) and Bedford Park Boulevard–Lehman College (4 train) stations of the New York City Subway are close. Additionally, the Bx10, Bx22, Bx26, and Bx28 lines of New York City Bus stop near Bronx Science.

Staten Island Technical High School
485 Clawson St, Staten Island, New York 10306

Stuyvesant High School
345 Chambers St, New York, New York 10282

High School of American Studies at Lehman College
2925 Goulden Ave, Bronx, New York 10468

Brooklyn Latin School
223 Graham Ave, Brooklyn, New York 11206

High School for Dual Language and Asian Studies
350 Grand St, New York, New York 10002

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